Friday, September 27, 2013

Advice & Giveaway with Debbie Rigaud


Another fun short story collection! Here's contributor Debbie Rigaud's writing advice. Leave a comment to win a copy of Open Mic.

What’s your best advice for fellow writers?

I’m still learning the ropes myself, but I’d advise fellow writers to not only continue developing their creative side, but to sharpen their business sense as well. What we do is creative, yes, but it’s also profession. Even though it may not come naturally to some of us (*raising my hand*), we have to learn to use both sides of our brains and have a healthy understanding about things like publishing contracts, e-book vs. print royalties, agent fees, and other small print information in the book of industry dealings.

What popular writing advice do you never follow?
I’ve heard of many writers who write reams and reams of very detailed back stories and character profiles before they start working on their manuscripts. Writers say it adds more layers to their writing and gives characters more depth. I can definitely see how developing back story can achieve all this, but it’s not something I incorporate in my writing process. Instead, I write a detailed plot summary and I work through the back stories while I’m working on my manuscript.
Where do you do most of your writing?
Over the past five-plus years while living in Bermuda, I did most of my writing on my dining room table. I regularly got together with Sylvia May, another author on the island and we’d host writing sessions at each other’s homes. I miss those days now that I’ve just moved back to the States, but I’m glad here I can work at local coffee shops. I’m at my most productive in these public settings.

What is the best book you’ve read lately on the craft of writing?
I always go back to the same popular writer’s guide, Anne Lamott’s “Bird by Bird.” It’s like Anne knows all of my creative struggles and understands what kind of tough love I need to stop procrastinating and start writing.
About OPEN MIC
Listen in as ten YA authors use their own brand of humor to share their stories about growing up between cultures. Edited by acclaimed author and speaker Mitali Perkins, this collection of fiction and nonfiction embraces a mix of styles as diverse as their authors, from laugh-out-loud funny to wry, ironic, or poignant, in prose, poetry and comic form.

About “Voila”
Thanks to overprotective parenting, Simone’s elderly great aunt Ma Tante has more of a social life than she does. But one afternoon, Ma Tante’s social scene awkwardly intersects with Simone’s in the unlikeliest of places.

About Debbie Rigaud
Debbie Rigaud began her writing career covering news and entertainment for popular magazines. Her YA fiction debut, HALLWAY DIARIES/Kimani Tru was followed by the fish-out-of-water romantic comedy PERFECT SHOT/Simon Pulse. Since then, Debbie’s non-fiction essays have been published in anthologies IT’S ALL LOVE/Broadway Books and DEAR BULLY/HarperTeen. Her short story “Voila!” is featured in OPEN MIC/Candlewick Press, and TURFQUAKE, her first YA e-book will be released late 2013. 
 www.debbierigaud.com

Leave a comment to win a copy! 

1 comment:

  1. Best writing advice I've ever heard: "Sit your a** in the chair." So simple, yet so hard some days!

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